Art Matters Foundation Fellowship Grant 

(2017) Art Matters is pleased to announce the recipients of its 2017 grants to individual artists, that includes Maria Gaspar. The foundation awarded 22 fellowships for ongoing work that breaks ground aesthetically and socially. In announcing the grants, Art Matters Director Sacha Yanow said, “We are thrilled to support this extraordinary group of artists from across the US. A diverse and expansive range of contemporary practice within various geographic and cultural contexts, their work engages justice and liberation issues and experiments with form. We feel their voices are important and through our funding, we hope to help amplify them.” 

 

Headlands Center for the Arts Chamberlain Award

(2017) The Chamberlain Award is a fully sponsored artist residency and cash prize at Headlands Center for the Arts in Sauasalito, CA designed to support an artist who displays exceptional merit working in the discipline of social practice. While at Headlands, Gaspar will be researching and developing an artist book that delves into issues of walls as dividers, separators, and barriers. Through writing, sound, and drawing, the book will bring together her community-based practices around contested geographies, power, and spatial justice, especially at a time of heightened xenophobia, anti blackness, and mass incarceration. 

 

William Bronson and Grayce Slovett Mitchell Award

(2017) The William Bronson Mitchell and Grayce Slovet Mitchell Enhancement Fund offers competitive awards to one or more faculty members at The School of the Art Institute who have received a major national or international award. The grantees are selected for the purpose of expanding upon the work for which their major award was granted. 

 

Robert Rauschenberg Artist As Activist Fellowship

(2016) Maria Gaspar will produce RADIOACTIVE: Stories from Beyond the Wall, a series of radio broadcasts and visual projections on the largest jail in the country–Cook County Jail in Chicago. Through connecting those who live outside its walls with those on the “inside,” the project aims to dissolve, transgress, and collectively reimagine the brutal 96-acre division.